Lula sees Venezuelan opposition from the perspective of polarization with Bolsonarism

Lula sees Venezuelan opposition from the perspective of polarization with Bolsonarism
Lula sees Venezuelan opposition from the perspective of polarization with Bolsonarism
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The president Lula needed to create an alibi to free himself from the shame he was experiencing for defending his democratic credentials. Nicolás Maduro. Over the last week, in what was interpreted by unwary people as a “turn” in the Brazilian government’s stance in relation to the Chavista dictatorship, Itamaraty released a note of “concern” about the “electoral process” in Venezuela, followed by a public statement of Lula in which he classified as “serious” the fact that one of the Venezuelan candidates was unable to register for the election. He was referring to Corina Yoris, who replaced Maria Corina Machadowhich the Maduro regime made ineligible because it was the favorite in the electoral polls.

The opponent was grateful for Lula’s words like a shipwrecked man clinging to anything to stay on the surface for a few moments longer, not because it could actually save him. Lula pretends that he defends democracy in Venezuela and the opposition pretends that his help can make a difference, as he has no other way out.

It was always clear that the Venezuelan dictator had no intention of promoting a clean and fair election, with the participation of competitive candidates. If he did so, he would certainly be defeated and would have to hand over power, opening his flank so that the insides of his regime were exposed, revealing the torture of political prisoners, corruption and links with drug trafficking, among other rot.

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Lula and Maduro at the Celac meeting, a group that brings together countries from Latin America and the Caribbean, this year Photograph: Ricardo Stuckert / PR

There is no prize high enough to convince Maduro to take the risk of leaving the Miraflores Palace. Unfortunately, Brazil has nothing to offer as an incentive. And even if she had, Lula wouldn’t want it. He cannot disguise his preference for the continuity of the Chavista regime. Even when he sets out to talk about an injustice committed against the opposition, he ends up exposing his disdain for that same opposition, such as when he ironizes the fact that Maria Corina chose a namesake as a replacement at the polls.

This occurs because Lula sees the Venezuelan opposition from the perspective of polarization with Bolsonarism. It doesn’t matter that, from an ideological point of view, the opposition in Venezuela is quite heterogeneous. Several independent left or center-left leaders have already been crushed by the Chavismo oppression machine. Maria Corina defends ideas known to the liberal right and is far from being an extremist, but she is treated as a fascist and terrorist by Maduro — a version that is replicated without any criticism or consideration by the Brazilian left.

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When he was president, Jair Bolsonaro supported the Venezuelan opposition more because of its role in confronting Chavismo than due to affinity of ideas or values. For him, opposing Maduro was opposing the PT. Lula’s rancor in relation to escuálids, as the opponents are called by the Chavistas, predates the polarization with Bolsonarism, but gained momentum with it. He doesn’t want really free elections in Venezuela, just a political alibi for domestic consumption.

The article is in Portuguese

Brazil

Tags: Lula sees Venezuelan opposition perspective polarization Bolsonarism

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