Dark movie with George Clooney on Netflix will make you paranoid for 105 minutes

Dark movie with George Clooney on Netflix will make you paranoid for 105 minutes
Dark movie with George Clooney on Netflix will make you paranoid for 105 minutes

Undertaking, overcoming difficulties, finding an activity that you enjoy enough to make a job of it, with all the emotional implications that a successful career will bring – and it does – is often an even more arduous task than paving the way. of glory. Success, by the way, exacts its price, as if analyzing what one can pay in life for having reached the top. Family, friends, bodily pleasures, moments of necessary reconnection with the sacred, and, of course, love are sacrificed, without which, deep down, nothing resembling victory is achieved, which has its pitfalls. so private. At this juncture, vanity becomes a thorn in anyone’s shoe, profess the faith that is closest to your most intimate convictions, especially if excessive, and it has such wide-ranging effects, with such immeasurable reach that we don’t even realize it. One of them, perhaps the most devastating, the most pernicious, is what provokes in other people the unpredictable and disproportionate reaction of attacking us, as if to preserve their own honor when recognizing a supposed inferiority, a poisoned arrow towards the heart of those who dare. win. Tom Jobim (1927-1994) once said that, in Brazil, the success of others is a personal offense. Perhaps the issue turns to a somewhat deeper, more unfathomable place, which also concerns the victorious: it could be that the negative energy we attract when we are successful is so powerful that, combined with our own vanity, it meets all the conditions for us to annihilate. Especially in an environment that by nature is prone to ambushes and disloyalty.

The Dutchman Anton Corbijn distills the hardships of a dark and unusual type in “A Mysterious Man” (2010), which smears out a less obvious side of one of Hollywood’s most sought-after celebrities, who by what can be confronted with history, still had a lot to reveal about himself and the way he sees his craft. Over the years, George Clooney has added to the heartthrob veneer the depth of an increasingly plural actor, capable of playing the damned men that cinema is so proud of, and, to the surprise of some, taking the reins of the filmmaking process. from one end to the other when starring and directing his own films, such as “O Céu da Meia-noite” (2020), “Good Night and Good Luck” (2005) and the still unpublished “The Boys in the Boat”, which premiered scheduled for 2023. Clooney is perhaps the most symbolic example of a film professional fully imbued with the spirit of mission at work by being able to combine an almost mediumistic intuition with appreciation for technique and experimentation, being very similar to another artist justifiably mythologized in the business, Clint Eastwood.

Corbijn’s direction gives Clooney the opportunity to take down, one by one, the clichés that are laid out for him in Rowan Joffe’s script, a chance he eagerly seizes. In the hands of someone less zealous, the story of a murderer highly valued for creating his own arsenal, half lost between remorse and the evidence of only knowing how to dedicate himself to this kind of service – in which, to be fair, he is one of the better — could result in a merry-go-round of platitudes, hopelessly tedious even for the audience most attached to these plots. Corbijn, however, demonstrates the necessary firmness in order not to take out of perspective the fact that Jack, his central character played by Clooney, is, yes, a criminal, but full of nuances that give him the sense of humanity that almost redeems him. In this regard, the idea of ​​attributing to the figure of a priest the post of best friend of Clooney’s anti-hero, forced to change his country, habits and plans, when he concludes that they have discovered your big secret. Jack, who also changes his name and becomes known as Edward Farfalla, ends up in Castelvecchio, a village on the outskirts of Verona, where he is involuntarily welcomed by Father Benedetto, by Paolo Bonacelli, a sequence that has its grace there. Although the lives of one and the other have taken diametrically opposite directions, Edward and Father Benedetto do not exactly become friends, but get closer – to the extent that two men from such disparate paths can come together, until that a revelation of Bonacelli’s character (which perhaps goes unnoticed to the less attentive viewer) lends itself to the enlightenment that the killer so badly needed to have some peace.

Corbijn handles Edward’s mood swings well and incorporates them into the narrative itself by making the film slide from the sacred to the profane in one frame’s time. Chiara’s entry on the scene softens the outsider’s thick skin even more, although he has always known that the flirtation with the prostitute played with rare beauty by Violante Placido can end in the same way as his relationship with the Swedish Ingrid, by Irina Bjorklund, whose murder was the final straw for him to seriously consider changing his life. As the story’s denouement makes clear, Jack’s clumsy choices throughout his life tie him to a tragic fate, sponsored by Pavel, the gangster incarnated by Johan Leysen, a psychopath who nurtures an obsession for him that remains to be enlightened.


Movie: A Mysterious Man
Direction: Anton Corbijn
Year: 2010
Genres: Suspense/Crime
Note: 8/10

The article is in Portuguese

Tags: Dark movie George Clooney Netflix paranoid minutes

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