Total solar eclipse happens next week, but will not be visible in Brazil | Science

Total solar eclipse happens next week, but will not be visible in Brazil | Science
Total solar eclipse happens next week, but will not be visible in Brazil | Science
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1 of 4 Total solar eclipse is seen in Oregon, in the United States, in a photo from August 21, 2017. — Photo: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani
Total solar eclipse is seen in Oregon, in the United States, in a photo from August 21, 2017. — Photo: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

Next Monday (8), lucky spectators from Mexico, the United States and Canada will have the chance to watch a total solar eclipse.

Although he NO be visible in Brazil (see visibility map below), This phenomenon is quite special. In the United States, for example, this is the first time in seven years that spectators in the country will catch something like this.

2 of 4 Visibility of the April 8 total solar eclipse. — Photo: Arte g1/Kayan Albertin
Visibility of the April 8 total solar eclipse. — Photo: Arte g1/Kayan Albertin

Thus, next week, depending on location, residents of these countries will witness either a partial solar eclipse or one total solar eclipse.

But what does this mean? First, we need to understand that a solar eclipse occurs when the Moon positions itself between the Sun and the Earth in such a way that it ends up casting a shadow on the Earth.

The Moon then blocks sunlight from reaching Earth.

Sometimes the Moon blocks only part of the Sun’s light, called partial or annular solar eclipse.

When the Moon blocks all light from the Sun, we have a total solar eclipse.

Understand the different types of eclipse by watching the video below:

See the difference in the photos below:

3 of 4 Photo shows the Sun completely covered by the Moon during a total solar eclipse. — Photo: Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP
Photo shows the Sun completely covered by the Moon during a total solar eclipse. — Photo: Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP

4 of 4 A partial solar eclipse seen from the English city of North Shields, in the north of the country. — Photo: Owen Humphreys/PA via AP
A partial solar eclipse seen from the English city of North Shields, in the north of the country. — Photo: Owen Humphreys/PA via AP

Thus, as you can see in the images above, in a total solar eclipsethe Earth, the Moon and the Sun align in such a way and in such an exact position that the entire star in our system is “covered” from Earth’s perspective – it is only possible to see the corona, the Sun’s atmosphere.

In case of partial solar eclipse, there is no alignment between the three celestial bodies. It occurs when the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth, but the Sun, Moon and Earth are not perfectly aligned.

Next week, observers from North American countries will see one of these phenomena.

According to NASA, the North American space agency, if weather conditions permit, the first place in continental North America to experience totality will be the Pacific coast of Mexico, around 3:07 pm on Monday (8) in the afternoon. Brasilia.

After that, the eclipse will travel across the United States, entering Texas and passing through other states until reaching Maine. It will then pass into Canada through Ontario and head into the North Atlantic, leaving the coast of Newfoundland at around 4:16 p.m.

The National Observatory and the North American space agency will broadcast the event live. To follow the ON broadcast, simply access the observatory channel at: youtube.com/observatorionacional.

When will we see an eclipse in Brazil?

The next solar eclipse in Brazil is of the annular type and will be on October 2, 2024. In much of the country, it will pass through as partial. In other words, whoever looks at the sky will see our Sun “bitten” by the Moon.

This happens because an annular solar eclipse always accompanies a partial solar eclipse.

And, in this case, the passage of the phenomenon will favor states in the South, Southeast (except the northern portion of Minas Gerais) and Mato Grosso do Sul. Residents of parts of Bahia, Goiás and Mato Grosso will also have the chance to catch the event.

In the rest of the country, this October eclipse will not be visible.

Lunar eclipses will not be as striking this year for lay observers. The last one was a penumbral lunar eclipse, in March, but in this type of eclipse it is not possible to detect a change in the Moon’s luminosity with the naked eye.

September’s partial lunar eclipse, for example, will be extremely faint. It will pass through all states in the country, but, at the height of the phenomenon, the coverage of the Moon will be just 0.08%.

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