The mind-blowing and underrated movie that is one of the most disturbing in movie history is on Netflix

The mind-blowing and underrated movie that is one of the most disturbing in movie history is on Netflix
The mind-blowing and underrated movie that is one of the most disturbing in movie history is on Netflix

We all go through moments when loneliness proves to be especially frightening, and it’s still our fault — some more than others, it’s true. There are people for whom blessings seem like curses, natural advantages become great adversaries and unabashedly favorable scenarios always end up hiding situations that unfold in a cornucopia of disturbances of all kinds. In the same way that especially unassisted individuals manage to draw strength from their vulnerabilities, mercilessly advancing on visible enemies and even more on those who cannot be seen, there are many people graced with the best that life has to offer and, even so, they develop an astonishing talent for turning beauty into hideousness. Even if the world were the bed of roses that an alienated minority paints, these people would never have any difficulty in making the flowers soon wither and only the smell of death and degradation to resist.

Glory and dishonor have always gone hand in hand, and there are those who think that this is the best of all worlds, as well as there are films with no intention of respecting possible limitations of the spectator and demanding nothing less than everything. Cameron Crowe excels in his ability to daydream about themes of inescapable relevance to humanity and makes “Vanilla Sky” (2001) an almost endless journey towards the scariest place in a man’s soul. Crowe certainly arrived at one of the most hermetic films ever made, and at the same time, one of the clearest, whose obviousness, so well hidden, frightens. A few scenes are enough to conclude that the plots in which “Vanilla Sky” is divided – all so mature that they would each give another film, perhaps even longer than the approximately 140 minutes of the central narrative – point to doubts. and false certainties that we have all had to a greater or lesser extent throughout life. And in that regard, it is ideal that a good few years pass between the first moment in which one comes into contact with such a sequence of musings about how to live and a second appreciation of Crowe’s good work.

Reproducing a script already seen in “Amnesia” (2000), directed by Christopher Nolan, with a protagonist like Patrick Bateman, from “American Psycho” (2000), brought to the screen by Mary Harron, the director’s script, a remake of “Incarcerated in the Darkness” (1997), by the Spanish artist Alejandro Amenábar, gives life to David Aames, the very problematic mogul of Tom Cruise’s almost flawless composition. At 33—Cruise was 39 at the time of filming—Aames is the all-powerful publisher of a publishing group, a position he was assigned effortlessly but with a good deal of pain when his parents died in a car accident. a few years ago. At one of the many parties he throws at the nababesque apartment where he lives alone, one of the most eligible bachelors in the northern hemisphere comes face to face with Julie Gianni, the “sexual friend” (of course the film says something more explicit) played by Cameron Diaz. , from those who try to get rid of it with a certain sacrifice and who were not invited. Shortly after, his best friend, Brian Shelby, arrives, excellent participation by Jason Lee, accompanied by Sofia Serrano, the brunette with piercing eyes played by Penélope Cruz.

Virtually everything that is important in “Vanilla Sky” begins, albeit obliquely, at this party, and it is essential to pay close attention to Diaz’s character. That foul expression that the males in the story use to mention her, an apparently silly detail that is easily lost amid a whirlwind of parallel events, ends up being the trigger for the misfortune that overtakes Aames, and from now on her life never returns to the same. bed. Crowe plays with gradually more complex dialogues, incorporating the shards born from Cruise and Cruz’s improvisations, while adding the other elements that make his film even more sophisticated, such as the discussion of a possible (and even probable) eternal life, making his point clear. point of view, rightly unfavorable. The appearance of Curtis McCabe, Kurt Russell’s psychiatrist, settles any residual doubts: this is a film to be watched many times, preferably with long breaks.


Movie: Vanilla Sky
Direction: Cameron Crowe
Year: 2001
Genres: Thriller/Science Fiction/Romance
Note: 8/10

The article is in Portuguese

Tags: mindblowing underrated movie disturbing movie history Netflix

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