Meet the women who are protagonists in the samba territory in cities in SC

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In the pages of the book “Canto de Rainhas” (Agir, 2021), journalist Leonardo Bruno provides an overview of the history of samba through the singers, showing the difficulties they faced simply because they were women. In one of the passages, Dona Ivone Lara (1947-2018) says that she paraded as a Bahian at the Carnival of Império Serrano, and not among the composers, because her clothes were prettier. But, in reality, she got bored trying to sing the sambas on the court and always being left until the end of the performances. Finally, she also did not accept having to omit her name and present the work as if it were the creation of a man.

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It was a time of struggle, until in 1965, she made history by officially becoming the first woman to appear in the composers section of a samba school. Pioneering spirit resulted from the structural machismo that hindered Dona Ivone’s artistic career.

With Carnival knocking on the door, the report shows the reality of women who in blocks, marching bands, bars, collectives and samba schools become increasingly protagonists in the music scene of Florianópolis and in other cities in the state, such as Blumenau It is Joinville. Despite gender inequalities that impose obstacles to more effective participation (taking care of the house, children, elderly parents, lower salaries than male professionals, lack of time to study and rehearse) women recognize progress.

– I started crying, in the 1980s. I was the only woman among six or seven men. You know that story where you arrive with your guitar and someone asks if you’re holding the instrument for your brother, boyfriend, friend? Today we have Roda de Choro Mulheril, a female musical collective made up of instrumentalists who play on Saturdays in the Historic Center of Florianópolis and Trindade – says Ana Claudia de Oliveira Segura, from Espaço Cultural Wagner Segura.

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For Ana Cláudia, also a professor at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), although a lot has changed, we still need to move forward.

– I believe that these female collectives, which gain strength through social media, work to combat the historical erasure of female figures. Particularly, it bothers me a little that Neide Maria Rosa (1936-1994), announcer, radio actress and singer who helped to project Santa Catarina music in the center of the country in the 1960s, is still little known in Florianópolis – she notes.

Dressed as a man to participate in the procession

Knowing, respecting, revering and rescuing the journey of those who came before is also in the heart of Eva Figueiredo. For the clarinetist, singer and composer who, among other things, created the block Filhas e Filhes de Eva in Jardim das Delícias and one of the creators of Fanfarra da Ponte, it is almost an imposition:

– I started playing myself because I saw a woman my age at the time, Maria Beraldo, playing the clarinet. Maria Beraldo, daughter of Silvia Beraldo, who I think is the only female soprista in Florianópolis, who was part of a feminist vanguard, which trained many women. Silvia Beraldo is one of those women who needs to be respected, as she is a very important figure in the trajectory of women in music – she says.

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Eva was 17 years old when she started studying clarinet. She was in the Commercial Philharmonic Band, a century-old entity in the center of Florianópolis. She was the only woman and had to wear men’s clothes to go out in processions. Today, at 38 years old and a mother, she sees the transformation as women arrive to study.

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For Eva, this change has to do with the feminist movement itself and the discussion is not just about samba and Carnival:

– We are faced with thinking about the issue of human rights.

Regarding the presence of women at Carnival, Eva believes it is connected to a national factor:

– I think Florianópolis is part of this national movement, which is the resumption of the so-called street Carnival blocks, just like Belo Horizonte and São Paulo. In this resumption, the fanfare emerged, making this difference and bringing a change: the women came to play together – she says.

The clarinetist is the only woman among the team of professional musicians responsible for the project, which includes a study group for wind and percussion training.

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Wing of tambourines and cuíca in their hands

You know that story about having a school to call your own? Well, Mirella Calixto has it: the Business Administration student is the director of the tambourine wing at Dascuia, a school in Maciço do Morro da Cruz, which this year has an important story about the inclusion of people on the autistic spectrum.

– I was in my mother’s womb and was already involved with samba, a family tradition. We started at Os Protegidos da Princesa, as only later did our family found Dascuia (2004). If I have a dream? This year I am working on becoming a ward director. I know it’s not easy, as we women have many challenges in the world of samba, but I dream of one day being a drum master – says Mirella.

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Giovana Silva Dutra is dedicated to the study of percussion. It was through the hands of professor Fabrício Gonçalves that she arrived at the Samba de Terreiro de Florianópolis Project, which runs circles in public spaces, such as the Rosário staircase, in the city center. Responsible for the cuíca section of the Dascuia samba school, the girl is optimistic about the recognition:

– I feel happy to be part of projects of this size. It is an immense joy to know that, despite it not being perfect, people are accepting and respecting our participation more. When I started, 10 years ago, the situation was different – ​​recalls Giovana.

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Therapeutic singing and the clarinet as lightness

Born in the interior of Rio Grande do Sul, Bianca Backes grew up watching her mother listen to good sambas. But it was when she left to study and work in bigger cities that the now journalist came into contact with the country’s most beloved genre. In 2009, when she arrived in Florianópolis, she realized that in addition to enjoying listening, she also enjoyed dancing and singing. From bar to bar, from show to show and from conversation to conversation, Bianca began to understand how revolutionary she was living.

– It was challenging to go to classes, do workshops, lose my shyness on stage and with the microphone without feeling obligated to do anything. It was therapeutic – says Bianca.

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A solo mother with almost exclusive dedication to her son, little by little the journalist is returning to samba spaces:

– This feeling of ease is connected to the large number of women present, which gives me security. In these places I met people with stories very different from mine, but I ended up happy with these meetings because I also know that for many others it is not easy to pursue a hobby in something that has always been seen as something belonging to the male universe.

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As a child, in Blumenau, Maiara Santos was sad: the school where she studied had no fanfare. Today, she was a graphic designer at a newspaper and currently works in software development, trying to resolve the “trauma”: she plays the clarinet at the irreverent Fanfara da Ponte, where she participates in the study group. Good student, she has a full schedule for the festive days:

– One thing calls another and I will be in six blocks. Until April last year, I hadn’t played any instrument. I discovered that I really like the sound of the clarinet, especially in the chorinho, which gives it lightness. I’m also going to play with the Daughters of Eve – she says.

Protagonism is equal to a launched arrow

From the sabotaged Dona Ivone Lara to the present day, the presence of women in musical culture is like an arrow launched that does not return. But it’s always good to remember another great of our music, Tereza Cristina, the first woman to interpret the Carnival theme Globeleza, by Jorge Aragão and José Franco Lattari, famous in the voice of Neguinho da Beija-Flor:

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– Samba was born from the hands of a woman and was taken from our hands. I think it is very important that women return to performing in samba, in all sectors, everywhere. Historical reparation pushes us forward. It’s great to be part of this. The woman is the protagonist because samba, in Rio de Janeiro, arrived through the hands of a woman. This role was hers.

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And Tereza Cristina follows:

– It’s taking back what was once ours.

Santa Catarina women agree.

See the women getting ready for the festivities in Florianópolis

Group of women gathered (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

Group of women gathered (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Maiara Santos, software developer and clarinetist (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Maiara Santos, software developer and clarinetist (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Maiara Santos, software developer and clarinetist (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Maiara Santos, software developer and clarinetist (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Eva Figueiredo, clarinetist, singer and composer (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Eva Figueiredo, clarinetist, singer and composer (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Ana Claudia de Oliveira Segura, musician and professor at UFSC (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Ana Claudia de Oliveira Segura, musician and professor at UFSC (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Bianca Backes, journalist and singer (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Bianca Backes, journalist and singer (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Bianca Backes, journalist and singer (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Giovana Silva Dutra, member of the Samba de Terreiro project in Florianópolis (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Giovana Silva Dutra, member of the Samba de Terreiro project in Florianópolis (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Giovana Silva Dutra, member of the Samba de Terreiro project in Florianópolis (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Marielle Calixto, Business Administration student, is the director of the tambourine wing at Dascuia (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Marielle Calixto, Business Administration student, is the director of the tambourine wing at Dascuia (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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Marielle Calixto, Business Administration student, is the director of the tambourine wing at Dascuia (Photo: Lucas Amorelli)

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The article is in Portuguese

Tags: Meet women protagonists samba territory cities

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