The number of bathers with symptoms of poisoning caused by the ‘red tide’ in AL rises to 245 | Alagoas

The number of bathers with symptoms of poisoning caused by the ‘red tide’ in AL rises to 245 | Alagoas
The number of bathers with symptoms of poisoning caused by the ‘red tide’ in AL rises to 245 | Alagoas
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Algae proliferation keeps bathers away from beaches on the Brazilian coast

The bathers, mostly tourists who were staying at a resort in Broken Carro Beachwere admitted to a health unit in the city with symptoms caused by poisoning, such as nausea, headache, sore throat, respiratory symptoms and even conjunctivitis.

Because of the records in Alagoas, technicians from the Environmental Institute (IMA) were at Praia de Carro Quebrado to collect water from points on the beach and identify whether there was a proliferation of algae there. The samples will be analyzed and the report should be ready within 10 days.

In a statement, the Municipality of Barra de Santo Antônio informed that “all beaches in the municipality are open for swimming and that there is no longer a risk for bathers in the localities”.

Despite this, the IMA recommendation is that the Swimming in the sea is avoided in the region for 48 hoursas it still contains a high organic load of these algae in the ocean. Bathers should also be aware of different colors and odors in the sea.

Phenomenon causes health problems

These toxins pass through the air, causing intoxication, as occurred in Barra de Santo Antônio, through wave spray.

People can breathe in these toxins and experience symptoms such as nausea, sore throat, stomach pain, cough, runny nose, nasal obstruction and signs of conjunctivitis, explains the specialist.

Oceanographer explains the formation of the Red Tide on the Alagoas Coast

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The article is in Portuguese

Brazil

Tags: number bathers symptoms poisoning caused red tide rises Alagoas

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